Attorney General Ashley Moody News Release
August 9, 2021
Contact: Kylie Mason
Phone: (850) 245-0150
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Member of Sibling Drug Trafficking Duo Sentenced to 25 Years in Prison


TALLAHASSEE, Fla.—Attorney General Ashley Moody’s Office of Statewide Prosecution today secured a 25-year sentence for Dilcia Mojica Phipps, a member of a sibling drug trafficking duo. Phipps, along with brother Hector Mojica Phipps, sold and distributed heroin and fentanyl throughout Central Florida. Dilcia will serve five years probation after the 25-year prison sentence.

Fentanyl is a highly lethal opioid. According to the Medical Examiner’s Interim Statewide Report for 2020, for the first time since 2013, drugs—specifically fentanyl—were found in more bodies of deceased persons than alcohol, with the data pointing to the majority of fentanyl occurrences being illicitly obtained. This sign of an increase in the illicit drug supply throughout Florida shows how fentanyl exacerbates the opioid crisis. Nearly 21 people in Florida die each day from opioid abuse.

Attorney General Ashley Moody said, “The battle to end the opioid crisis often spills into the courtroom, where we work to put those trafficking illicit opioids like fentanyl behind bars. It is so important that prosecutors across our state hold fentanyl traffickers accountable so that we may save the lives of countless Floridians. I’m pleased my Statewide Prosecutors secured this lengthy prison sentence for this drug trafficker—so she will no longer be able to sell poison and perpetuate the opioid crisis that kills 21 people each day in our state.”

According to an investigation by the Metropolitan Bureau of Investigation, Dilcia’s brother Hector sold and distributed kilos of heroin and fentanyl throughout Central Florida. A wiretap revealed Hector’s source of the illicit drugs came from Mexico. Additionally, the investigation revealed that Dilcia trafficked fentanyl for the operation in his absence.

On June 3, a jury convicted Dilcia Mojica Phipps on three felony charges, including trafficking fentanyl, conspiracy to traffic heroin—each first-degree felonies; and the unlawful use of a two-way communications device to facilitate the commission of a felony—a third-degree felony.

On June 17, a jury convicted Hector Mojica Phipps of nine felony charges, including trafficking heroin, trafficking fentanyl, conspiracy to traffic heroin—each first-degree felonies; possession of a firearm in the commission of a felony—a second-degree felony; and the unlawful use of a two-way communications device to facilitate the commission of a felony—a third-degree felony. Hector Mojica Phipps is scheduled for sentencing on Aug. 27.

Assistant Statewide Prosecutors Mary Sammon and Nicole Philips of Attorney General Moody’s OSP prosecuted Dilcia Mojica Phipps’ case. Sammon and Assistant Statewide Prosecutor Gary Malak of OSP prosecuted Hector Mojica Phipps’ case.